Which are the most frequently involved peripheral joints in calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition at imaging? A systematic literature review and meta-analysis by the OMERACT ultrasound – CPPD subgroup - Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines Access content directly
Journal Articles Frontiers in Medicine Year : 2023

Which are the most frequently involved peripheral joints in calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition at imaging? A systematic literature review and meta-analysis by the OMERACT ultrasound – CPPD subgroup

Antonella Adinolfi
  • Function : Author
  • PersonId : 1376334
Silvia Sirotti
  • Function : Author
Garifallia Sakellariou
  • Function : Author
Edoardo Cipolletta
  • Function : Author
Emilio Filippucci
  • Function : Author
Francesco Porta
  • Function : Author
Anna Zanetti
  • Function : Author
Nicola Ughi
  • Function : Author
Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini
  • Function : Author
Carlo Alberto Scirè
  • Function : Author
Helen Keen
  • Function : Author
Carlos Pineda
  • Function : Author
Lene Terslev
  • Function : Author
Georgios Filippou
  • Function : Author

Abstract

Objectives To identify the prevalence of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPPD) using ultrasound and conventional radiology at peripheral joints in patients with suspected or definite CPPD. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and Embase using pre-defined search strategies from inception to April 2021 to identify studies that evaluated conventional radiology and ultrasound in detecting CPPD at peripheral joints, including definite or suspected CPPD [Research question 1 (RQ1) and Research Question 2 (RQ2), respectively]. For the meta-analysis, the first, second, and third sub-analysis included studies with the knee, and knee or wrist as the index joint for CPPD (without restrictions on the reference standard) and synovial fluid analysis or histology as a reference standard (without restrictions on the index joint), respectively. Results One-thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven manuscripts were identified, of which 94 articles were finally included. Twenty-two and seventy-two papers were included in RQ1 and RQ2, respectively. The knee had the highest prevalence for RQ1 and RQ2 by both conventional radiology and ultrasound, followed by the wrist with the highest prevalence for RQ1. The hand had the lowest CPPD prevalence. The third sub-analysis showed a higher CPPD prevalence on ultrasound than conventional radiology at the knee (only data available). Conclusion Among all peripheral joints, the knees and wrists could be regarded as the target joints for CPPD detection by imaging. Furthermore, ultrasound seems to detect a higher number of calcium pyrophosphate deposits than conventional radiology, even when using a more restrictive reference standard.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
fmed-10-1131362.pdf (3.4 Mo) Télécharger le fichier
Origin Publisher files allowed on an open archive

Dates and versions

hal-04551341 , version 1 (18-04-2024)

Identifiers

Cite

Antonella Adinolfi, Silvia Sirotti, Garifallia Sakellariou, Edoardo Cipolletta, Emilio Filippucci, et al.. Which are the most frequently involved peripheral joints in calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition at imaging? A systematic literature review and meta-analysis by the OMERACT ultrasound – CPPD subgroup. Frontiers in Medicine, 2023, 10, ⟨10.3389/fmed.2023.1131362⟩. ⟨hal-04551341⟩
2 View
1 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More